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By Nico Martinez
CCC Journalism Program

Pokémon, Magic: The Gathering, and Yu-Gi-Oh! are just three of many popular trading card games that are played by millions worldwide, including students at Camden County College, but as of last semester the games have been banned from being played on campus.

A third-year student at CCC, Lucas Gonzales, said he remembered seeing people playing trading card games in the cafeteria not too long ago and didn’t know it was against the rules now to do so. As to the idea that disciplinary action is given to those caught playing those kinds of games, he stated, “I can’t believe they would even bother. It’s a shame, the people I remember seeing that played those games didn’t seem like the type to get in any trouble or would ever want to.”

Renee Pollard, a secretary for Student Life and Services at Camden County College, said the reason the trading card games were banned from being played on campus was the similarities they had with traditional card games that are used in casinos when gambling for money. The rules in most of the trading card games that students were playing apparently included rolling dice or flipping coins. Even though the game might not require or be associated with gambling, the school decided it had no choice but to ban it anyway because of its rules regarding chance.

Another reason given for the ban was the concern that someone who was addicted to the trading card games might become rowdy in the cafeteria, as an addicted gambler playing in a casino does by yelling when losing or winning, thereby disturbing someone trying to eat in peace.

CCC junior Joe Reed, who is an avid player of these kinds of trading card games, disagreed that players would disturb the people around them. “It’s unfair to assume that someone is going to scream and shout when they win or lose,” Reed said. “Just because we play a game that younger kids also play doesn’t mean we’ll act like them when we play it.”

Students gather in the lounge area of the Cougar Café. By Nico Martinez, CCC Journalism Program

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